The Ministry of Deacon

The Ministry of Deacon

FOR ALL THOSE INVOLVED IN THE MINISTRY OF DEACON
1. Will I have to change anything I do?
You will need to know the same changes to sung and spoken responses and prayers as everyone else, and in particular the new texts that you will be asked to say instead of those you use at present. These are quite extensive and include: Invocations in the Penitential Rite, request for a blessing before proclaiming the Gospel, the announcement “The Gospel of the Lord” at the end of the Gospel, the four new dismissals at the end of Mass. You’ll also need to become used to a different altar missal and possibly other booklets during the time of transition from the old missal to the new one.

The new altar missal is due to be published in three formats:

(a) Altar edition: this will be quite heavy to hold and carry.
(b) Reduced-size edition, for use at the priest’s chair: this will be smaller and lighter, and will be missal that servers hold up for the priest to read from.
(c) Travelling edition: an even smaller edition for private study use and for priests or deacons on pilgrimages and other situations where it is not practicable to take a larger edition.

2. Are there any texts in the Mass that speak especially to my ministry?
Bearing in mind the threefold diaconal ministry of charity, word and altar, the following are useful for reflection: Ministry of Charity
Both the Eucharistic Prayers for Reconciliation
Ministry of the Word
The priest’s blessing of the deacon before the Gospel: May the Lord be in your heart and on your lips that you may proclaim his Gospel worthily and well . . .
Ministry at the Altar
In Eucharistic Prayer II: We offer you, Lord, the Bread of life and the Chalice of salvation, giving thanks that you have held us worthy to be in your presence and minister to you.

Useful resources

Our national liturgy website: www.romanmissalscotland.org.uk
http://www.liturgyoffice.org.uk/
General Instruction of the Roman Missal
 
http://www.liturgyoffice.org.uk/Resources/GIRM/Documents/GIRM.pdf  and its companion Celebrating the Mass
http://www.liturgyoffice.org.uk/Resources/GIRM/Documents/GIRM.pdf
PDF of the revised Order of Mass: http://www.nccbuscc.org/romanmissal/order-of-mass.pdf

FOR ALL THOSE INVOLVED IN THE MINISTRY OF DISTRIBUTING HOLY COMMUNION
1. Will I have to change anything I do?
Only the same changes to sung and spoken responses and prayers as everyone else, so make sure you know what they are. However, if you take Communion to the sick and housebound and share scripture with those you visit, you would find it useful also to take a look at the Ministry handout for Readers.

2. Perhaps there are things I should listen out for?
Well, there is one acclamation after the consecration in the Eucharistic Prayer that speaks especially to Ministers of Communion. It’s the one that begins “When we eat this bread and drink this Cup…” Instead of ending “until you come in glory”, it will now end “until you come again”.

Sometimes it’s very easy to sing or say the present words and not really think about what they mean. What does it mean to proclaim the Lord’s death? And how will eating and drinking Jesus’ body and blood help us to do this more effectively? In our ministry, how can we help to ensure that the act of eating and drinking is an act filled with holiness, and not something that we might start to take for granted? The slight change to the wording is an opportunity for us to renew the meaning that this acclamation should have for us.

And, just before Communion itself, we will now be saying “Lord, I am not worthy that you should enter under my roof, but only say the word and my soul shall be healed.” To anyone who remembers what the first masses in English were like in the 1960s, this will sound very familiar. It recalls the centurion who told Jesus that he was not worthy to have Jesus under the roof of his house. We too can say that we are not worthy for Jesus to enter the “house” that is our body. (Remember St Paul telling us that our bodies are temples of the Holy Spirit ─ 1 Cor 16:19.) And if we meet anyone thinking that this refers to the roof of our mouth, we can explain what the actual scriptural memory is here.

The centurion asked for healing for his daughter; we ask for healing for our souls, the core of who we are as Christians.

3. What other aspects of my ministry could I look at?
Not through any fault of their own, some people were never offered proper training for this ministry. They were just asked to do it, and started immediately. It’s good to be sure that you are properly prepared for your ministry. One of the most important things is the ‘five-fold movement’ for ministers of the chalice:

(a) Give the chalice to the communicant. While they are drinking from it
(b) Move the purificator along so that you use a different part of it to wipe from the part you used for the previous person.
(c) Take back the chalice from the communicant.
(d) Wipe thoroughly, both inside and outside the rim that the communicant has drunk from.
(e) Turn the chalice a quarter turn, so as to present a new part of the rim to the next communicant.

A proportion of Ministers of Communion were never shown how to do some of the ‘movements’ ─ for example, the two different ways of handling the purificator ─ and may not even know that they exist.

In the same way, some training for Ministers of Communion did not cover the particular requirements of taking Communion to the sick and housebound, so this could be an opportunity for some further formation.

Useful resources

Our national Liturgy Office website: http://romanmissalscotland.org.uk or
http://www.liturgyoffice.org.uk/
especially http://www.liturgyoffice.org.uk/Resources/GIRM/Ministry/Communion.pdf
A sample set of Guidelines for Ministers of Communion:
http://www.portsmouthdiocese.org.uk/userfiles/Ministers%20of%20Communion%20diocesan%20guidelines%2009%20revision.pdf
Ministers of Holy Communion
Donald A. Withey, Decani Books, ISBN 1-900314-01-0
Guide for Extraordinary Ministers of Holy Communion
Kenneth A. Riley and Paul Turner, LTP. ISBN 978-1-56854-608-7 [available from McCrimmons]
Handbook for Ministers of Care (2nd edition)
Genevieve Glen OSB, Marilyn Kofler SP, Kevin O’Connor, LTP, ISBN 1-56854-102-3 [available from McCrimmons]
Liturgical Ministry: a practical guide to spirituality
Donna M. Cole, Resource Publications, ISBN 0-89390-372-8
Ministry- 1 Mnisters of Holy Communion
Parish Resources

Parish Resources

This section of the website contains a variety of resources to help parishes and parish ministers understand the new translation and their role in the celebration of the Church’s liturgy. Please consult the menu to the left of this page. Material is provided for specific ministries (Readers, Deacons, Servers etc.) along with general catechetical material (bulletin inserts, various leaflets etc.). This section also contains material for those who might wish to spend more time going a little bit further into the text.

At the end of each page you will find the content of that page as an attachment prepared as a handout for printing.

Website under construction. Thank you for your patience.

The Ministry of Welcome

The Ministry of Welcome

FOR ALL THOSE INVOLVED IN THE MINISTRY OF WELCOMING


1. Will I have to change anything I do?
Only the same changes to sung and spoken responses and prayers as everyone else, so make sure you know what they are. You may well be asked to give out new materials to help people participate at Mass more effectively during the transition to a new Missal. These might include cards with the Order of Mass, special service sheets or booklets, new hymnbooks or supplementary booklets.

It will be good to familiarise yourself with what you are distributing so that you can respond to any questions that people may have. You may also want to know why some of these things are happening, so the general formation sessions in your parish or pastoral area will be useful for you too.

2. Are there any texts in the Mass that speak especially to my ministry?
Two in particular are relevant to your ministry:

The Creed, the profession of faith of the whole body, the Church. As a welcomer, you are greeting people as they come to join the local ‘manifestation’ of that body.

The greeting “Behold the Lamb of God, behold him who takes away the sins of the world. Blessed are those called to the supper of the Lamb.” Your ministry is part of that calling to the supper of the Lamb, as you welcome people into the church for Mass. You represent the Church, as it calls people to the Table of the Lord.

3. What other aspects of my ministry could I look at?
It’s always useful for welcomers to look at such things as: where they stand when they are welcoming people; what their body language is like; whether people can readily identify them as welcomers (badges, etc); whether they are able to resist the temptation to chat to their friends as they arrive instead of greeting visitors and strangers; if the welcomers are also ushers, how unobtrusive or otherwise they are;also when and how they select people for the procession of gifts. All this can be done with the whole group of welcomers, and may provide some amusement as well as progress!

A more delicate area to explore is the face of the welcomer.
Do you look welcoming?
Is your face ‘open’ or do you look a bit serious?
Do you genuinely smile at people when they arrive?
Do you make them feel that you actually want them to be there?

Sometimes a tiny thing such as raising the eyebrows a fraction of an inch can make all the difference, conveying a completely different expression and turning what can be a routine act into one where the welcomed person feels that they really matter to you today! And those encounters are the seeds of building a stronger community in the locality.

The trick is to make the person you are welcoming feel that they have your whole attention, that you are focused on them alone, even if only for a second or two, and that being in church is going to be a pleasant experience.

It is also important to be aware that some people are shy and think that they do not want your attention. They are trying to ‘sneak’ in unnoticed. In such cases, it is still very important to smile genuinely at them; and this may even change the way they are feeling. Yes, the ministry of the welcomer is all about sensitivity!

Useful resources

Our national Liturgy website: http://www.romanmissalscotland.org.uk
or http://www.liturgyoffice.org.uk/ especially http://www.liturgyoffice.org.uk/Resources/GIRM/Ministry/Hospitality.pdf
Material on the Ministry of Welcome will be found at
http://www.everybodyswelcome.org.uk/resources.html
and
http://www.everybodyswelcome.org.uk/resources_by_parishes.html
Guide for Ushers and Greeters
Karie Ferrell and Paul Turner, LTP, ISBN 978-1-56854-745-9 [available from McCrimmons]
Liturgical Ministry: a practical guide to spirituality
Donna M. Cole, Resource Publications, ISBN 0-89390-372-8
The Ministry of Sacristan

The Ministry of Sacristan

FOR ALL THOSE INVOLVED IN THE MINISTRY OF SACRISTAN and THE MINISTRY OF THE ENVIRONMENT

1. Will I have to change anything I do?
You will need to know the same changes to sung and spoken responses and prayers as everyone else.
Sacristans will also need to become used to a different altar missal, and possibly other pew sheets or booklets during the time of transition from the old missal to the new one.

The new altar missal is due to be published in three formats:

(a) Altar edition: this will be quite heavy to hold and carry.
(b) Reduced-size edition, for use at the priest’s chair: this will be smaller and lighter, and will be the missal that servers hold up for the priest to read from.
(c) Travelling edition: an even smaller edition for private study use and for priests on pilgrimages and other situations where it is not practicable to take a larger edition.

Apart from the new texts of the Order of Mass, most other things should remain unchanged. There will eventually be a new Lectionary to go with the new Missal, but this will not happen for several years. However, there will certainly be new editions of our current hymnbooks, containing both revised mass settings and new ones. Before parishes change to those, there may well be a time when pew cards with new music for congregations will be required.

2. Are there any texts in the Mass that speak especially to my ministry?
The ‘Berakah’ prayers at the presentation of the gifts:. . . through your goodness we have received the bread we offer you: fruit of the earth and work of human hands . . . the wine we offer you: fruit of the vine and work of human hands . . .

In Eucharistic Prayer III:“. . . from the rising of the sun to its setting a pure sacrifice may be offered to your name.”

3. What other aspects of my ministry could I look at?
Sacristans usually have to work in close collaboration with many other liturgical ministers. It can be useful to examine whether there might be better ways of doing this. Sometimes we end up doing things less efficiently, and even less charitably, than we could do because “we’ve always done it that way”! Sacristans and ministers of the environment — cleaners, those who do the flowers, those who launder the linens, etc — are often the unsung heroes of what goes on behind the scenes. Other people do not usually see their ministry in action, but only the results of it. A day of recollection — or a party! — once a year can help keep these unseen ministers engaged and enthusiastic about what they do.

Useful resources

Our national Liturgy website:
http://www.romanmissalscotland.org.uk or the liturgy website for the Bishops’ Conference of England and Wales
http://www.liturgyoffice.org.uk/
 The Ministry of Liturgical Environment
Joyce Ann Zimmerman, Liturgical Press, ISBN 0-8146-2705-6 [available via Columba]
 Guide for Sacristans
Corinna Laughlin and Paul Turner, LTP, ISBN 978-1-56854-746-6 [available from McCrimmons
 Liturgical Ministry: a practical guide to spirituality
Donna M. Cole, Resource Publications, ISBN 0-89390-372-8
Minstry – 5 Sacristan